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WEDNESDAY JUNE 5, 2019
  • 1:00 PM – 7:00 PM  - Sponsor setup at the law school
  •  3:00 PM – 7:00 PM - Conference check-in at the law school
    • Pizza and beverage will be served
  • 6:00 PM - 6:30 PM - optional presenters meeting - room 136

All CALIcon19 sessions will be live streamed. Just click on the "Watch Live!" button in each session description. 
If you’re watching remotely you  can use the CALIcon Slack community to ask questions. To join the community visit http://slack2019.calicon.org/  and enter your email address. Once you’ve joined there is a  channel for each room, join those channels ask questions during the session. Here are links for each channel:

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Thursday, June 6
 

8:00am

Breakfast 1
Breakfast 1


Thursday June 6, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

9:00am

Keynote - Prof. Dave Yearwood
Biography

Dave Yearwood is a Professor in the School of Entrepreneurship. He was a Graduate Director in two disciplines (Technology and the Ph.D. program in Teaching and Learning) and also the past chair of the Technology Department at the University of North Dakota. Dave has been teaching in higher education for 30 years, first at a Community College and for the last 22 years at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Yearwood's two research interests are: Electronic Pedagogy & the purposeful use of technological tools in education to enhance teaching and learning; and the study of control or semi-automatic/automatic systems for use in commercial and/or consumer settings.

Dr. Yearwood was presented with the outstanding teacher award in the College of Business and Public Administration (CoBPA) on two occasions, and he also earned the coveted combined Teaching, Service, and Scholarship award (CoBPA). In 2009 Dave was one of four professors recognized nationally by the Association of Technology, Management and Applied Engineering (ATMAE) as Outstanding Professor in the areas of Teaching, Research, and Service.

Thursday June 6, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
103 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

10:30am

Break I
Thursday June 6, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

11:00am

Deploying a Legal Technology Education Program; Panel Discussion Regarding Tackling The Issue of Technology Competency
Session Title: Deploying a Legal Technology Education Program; Panel Discussion Regarding Tackling The Issue of Technology Competency
Panelists:
  • Corinne St. Claire, Loyola Law School Los Angeles
  • Jayesh Rathod, American University
  • Ulysses Jaen, Ave Maria School of Law
  • Asli Karaevli, Ave Maria School of Law
Moderator: Douglas Lusk, National Society for Legal Technology
Session Goal:
A panel discussion about how three law schools uniquely approached the challenge of teaching technology competency to their students. We will take a deep dive into how each school has utilized the NSLT's Legal Technology Certificate program as the base curriculum. The panelists will each discuss the method they chose for deploying the program (i.e. classroom curriculum, drop-in seminars, independent study, externship training material, etc.) and how the students have reacted to the approach. Each will discuss the successes and hardships they experienced while launching the program and what their plan is for the program in the coming year.

Speakers
avatar for Douglas Lusk

Douglas Lusk

CEO, NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR LEGAL TECHNOLOGY
The NSLT provides course material for Law Office Technology and eDiscovery Software courses at over 135 Law Schools and Paralegal Programs across the U.S. and Canada. The NSLT also has independent study students in 9 countries around the world!
avatar for Corinne St. Claire

Corinne St. Claire

Director of Law School Technology Services, Loyola Law School Los Angeles
Corinne St. Claire joined Loyola Law School Los Angeles in 2011 as Assistant Director of Instructional Design & Technology. In 2016, she transitioned to Director of Law School Technology Services. With close to 13 years of experience in higher education, she has facilitated and managed... Read More →
avatar for Ulysses Jaen

Ulysses Jaen

Director & Asst. Prof., AMSL Library
Ulysses Jaen Library Director & Assistant Professor Ulysses N. Jaen is the Director of the Ave Maria School of Law Library. He has worked as an entrepreneur, business manager and legal professional, taught in the Master’s in Legal Studies program at West Virginia University, and... Read More →


Thursday June 6, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

11:00am

Legal Analytics at GSU Law
Ben Chapman, Executive Director of the Legal Analytics & Innovation Initiative at GSU College of Law will be speaking about the new legal analytics program at Georgia State.


He'll be talking about the development of the legal analytics program at GSU, various legal analytics projects that have already been undertaken at GSU, as well as our plans for the future.


Come to this talk to:


  • learn more about legal analytics

  • learn about why GSU thinks we should be teaching legal analytics

  • learn about leveraging unique partnerships to differentiate your program

  • see sloths and croissants together on one slide

This is a non-technical talk aimed at faculty and staff involved in teaching, program development, and analytics.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Chapman

Ben Chapman

Executive Director, Legal Analytics & Innovation, Georgia State University College of Law



Thursday June 6, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

11:00am

What Can Librarians Do to Facilitate Access to Justice?
People who have legal needs, but not the resources to meet those needs may view libraries and librarians as sources of legal information.  This session is designed to show librarians ways that they may assist in the provision of legal information and avoid giving legal advice.

The session will include a discussion of the justice gap and how the justice gap affects the work of librarians. In addition, we will explore law, ethics, and library policies relevant to the work of librarians. Generally, patrons who are not affiliated with a law school do not have access to the law school's subscription databases and in those cases librarians have directed patrons to print resources available in the general reference collection of the library. However, myriad open access resources useful to public patrons are available online and we will examine these resources.

The session is designed for all librarians who assist members of the general public in finding information, whether just starting out in the profession or having years of experience.

Attendees of this session will be able to:

  1.  Distinguish between legal information and legal advice.
  2.  Identify ways to provide legal information.
  3.  Identify steps to protect patrons' privacy at the reference desk.


Speakers
LW

Latia Ward

Research Services Librarian and Diversity Fellow, Cornell University Law Library


Thursday June 6, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
288 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

11:00am

MDM - A Technological Approach to the day to day Clinical Challenges
The main focus of this session will be on safeguarding all the information that gets transacted during the interaction that clinicians and supervisors have with clients, potential clients, attorneys, and court houses. This session will also cover the multiple technology challenges encountered while clinicians interact in a real world scenario. Topics covered include, device encryption, security profiles, secure email access, secure web browser, device management, device/OS hardening, Group Policy Settings, file management, secure file editing/sharing, wireless access, password policies, and domain accounts. All this from the Mobile Device Management standpoint.


Speakers
CP

Cesar Peralta

Tech Analyst, UNM School of Law


Thursday June 6, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

12:00pm

Lunch 1
Lunch 1


Thursday June 6, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

12:30pm

Library Tour
Tour the library!

Thursday June 6, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Registration

12:30pm

Tech Tour
Hear from Doug Dahlkemper, Principal (SmithGroup), Gary Moore, Assistant Dean for Academic Technology (UofSC Law), and Adam Martin, Audiovisual Instructional Technology Specialist (UofSC Law) as they give a guided tour of the law school explaining all the integral physical nuances, critical thinking decisions behind the technology infrastructure that went into the designing the new University of South Carolina School of Law building.  

Thursday June 6, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Registration

1:30pm

Law Students + Access To Justice + Legal Education Technology = A2J Author
CALI's A2J Author® suite has been used to teach students the law through technology in an engaging way by constructing meaningful solutions to legal problems in their community. This session will:


  1. walk you through the basics of the underlying tech behind A2J Author
  2. provide hands on A2J Authoring of A2J Guided Interviews ® and document assembly
  3. teach you how to bring A2J Author to your classroom
  4.  give you an opportunity to inquire, request, and discuss possible future features.



Speakers
avatar for Jessica Frank

Jessica Frank

A2J Author Project Manager, The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction
Jessica Frank is the A2J Author Project Manager for the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI). She oversees the development team for A2J Author and provides community outreach, technical support, and training resources to the automated document development community... Read More →
TN

Tobias Nteireho

Backend Developer, The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction
Tobias Nteireho is the Backend Developer for CALI. He holds a BS in Electrical Engineering from Drexel University. Tobias has been working on A2J since November 2017. He is currently developing software including A2J.org, maintaining and deploying servers, and providing support to... Read More →
avatar for John Mayer

John Mayer

Executive Director, The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction
Executive Director of CALI - law school consortium. Developers of A2J Author and hosts of A2J.org. Not a lawyer, 30 years working in tech, legal education and access to justice.


Thursday June 6, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
288 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

1:30pm

Teaching Technology Skills by Design, by Ambush, and in Context
We think our current generation of law students can navigate technology easily because they have always used technology.  Indeed, our current law students think the same thing.  We are both wrong: being comfortable using technology and being efficient using technology are not the same.  However, our students need to understand how to use technology efficiently because the practice of law demands that efficiency, particularly as technology becomes more integrated into law practice. Just as importantly, law students themselves would benefit from using their technology more efficiently.  But how do you convince law students that they need to shift their thinking about using technology?  How do you convince busy law students to take the time to learn technology skills? And how do you stretch thin resources to create an effective learning environment in which to teach these technology skills?

At the University of South Carolina School of Law, we have thought through these questions, and our answer is to teach technology skills by focusing on three methods: design, ambush, and context. Gary Moore, Assistant Dean for Academic Technology, will speak about teaching technology skills by design; Gary helped to design a course, "Technology and the Practice of Law", which he currently co-teaches with a faculty emeritus. Eve Ross, Reference Librarian, will speak about teaching technology skills by ambush; Eve organized a series of Pop-Up Tech Talks in which a varied group of faculty and staff set up in heavily student-trafficked areas to provide a series of five minute demonstrations on discrete technology topics. Amy Milligan, Assistant Director of Legal Writing, will speak about teaching technology skills in context; Amy created an online guide, Microsoft Word Fundamentals for Efficient Lawyers and Law Students, which focuses on Word skills that her students will need to efficiently complete assignments for her class.

We hope that attendees will leave our session with some ideas for how they can address teaching technology skills in their own schools.

Speakers
AM

Amy Milligan

Assistant Director of Legal Writing, University of South Carolina School of Law
GM

Gary Moore

Assistant Dean for Academic Technology, University of South Carolina School of Law
avatar for Eve Ross

Eve Ross

Reference Librarian, University of South Carolina School of Law


Thursday June 6, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

1:30pm

Are You Experienced? - Simple Timesheets for Experiential Learning Courses
ABA Standards require students to complete six credit hours of experiential learning.  Hours must be tracked, and field placements in particular require students to keep logs of their activities to document compliance.  Various web-based solutions are used, including high-end suites like CORE ELMS, the Symplicity experiential learning module, and the basic and free Dropbox and Google Suite as well as Canvas, and a time-tracking program called Tick. Here at the University of Georgia School of Law, we decided to add simple timesheet functionality to our Drupal-based student portal, allowing students to securely log their hours and activities, and faculty to view total hours at a glance.


The system has been working well enough, but it's time to move the portal to Drupal 8, and I thought why not create a distribution that comes with all the modules and functionality needed so that other schools could use this simple, customized, open-source system? So, that is the plan. This session requires no technical background, but should be of interest to clinical faculty who would like to implement such a system and IT staff who would like to learn more about creating and using Drupal 8 installation profiles, because sometimes reinventing the wheel _is_ the right answer.



Speakers
LG

Leslie Grove

Web Developer, University of Georgia School of Law
Drupal, Sass, Cats, Coffee
EL

Eleanor Lanier

Associate Dean for Clinical Programs and Experiential Learning, University of Georgia School of Law


Thursday June 6, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

1:30pm

Haints and Boogers in the Ether
Just because you are not paranoid does not mean you are not being hacked.


Exploring the ever evolving stance of professional and personal data security in the world that will just not not stand still. Zero day Haints (exploits) and age old Boogers (latent bugs). It is hard to talk about data security without sounding like an alarmist. We will explore a few ways to go from condition white, unaware and unprepared, to condition yellow, relaxed awareness, and some of the higher conditions that may get triggered during an "event".


While this talk may become technical it will be made as accessible as possible. We will touch on social engineering, data integrity, and the current landscape of IT security. Tools will be demonstrated and techniques will be discussed to raise situational awareness, rather than paralyzing paranoia.


Speakers
DN

Dan Nagy

System Engineer, CALI


Thursday June 6, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

2:30pm

Break II
Thursday June 6, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

3:00pm

S. C. Legal Services Presentation of Learn the Law Online Classrooms (The Process)

"Detours, Switchbacks and Straightaways: Designing, Creating and Producing an Online Classroom on LearntheLaw.org"
A panel discussion of the experience of the S.C. Legal Services Project Team in creating 5 online classrooms on LearntheLaw.org with a Technology Innovation Grant from Legal Services Corporation. The panel will be moderated by attorney Leslie Fisk who was also one of five classroom coordinators.
Panelists from various stages of the process will include a law student, designer/animator and project coordinator. They will talk about how they helped make it all happen.
The discussion will include lessons learned on collaboration with private attorneys, judiciary, state bar association, law students, A2JAuthors, and other groups.  There will also be a discussion about the lessons learned from content creation, including 21st century learning styles and plain language.  Methods of feedback and evaluation will also be covered. Finally, the panelists will review the technology that made it all happen and what they might do differently with future classes--which they intend to create because of the success of this experience and the reception the classrooms have received.

Speakers
SI

Susie Ingels

Consumer Unit Head, South Carolina Legal Services
Susan Ingles is a Sr. Staff Attorney and Consumer Law Unit Head for S.C. Legal Services (SCLS), a statewide non-profit law firm where her practice is devoted to consumer law and she launched the SCLS Constitution Day Legal Forum in 2012. Before coming to SCLS in September 2004, she... Read More →
LF

Leslie Fisk

Managing Attorney, S.C. Legal Services


Thursday June 6, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
288 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

3:00pm

They said there would be no math: Law schools teaching high-tech and high-concept courses
This session will focus on the courses and programs law schools offer that teach advanced technologies and tech concepts.
Deborah Ginsberg, Chicago-Kent
Alex Rabanal, Chicago-Kent
The Law Lab is Chicago-Kent’s interdisciplinary teaching and research center focused on legal innovation and technology.  Through the Lab, in addition to taking standard law school courses like Bus Orgs and Evidence, law students study Legal Analytics; Legal Project Management + Process Improvement (Lean / Six Sigma); Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, and Law; and more.  
Over the last few years, many law schools have offered certificates and courses designed to provide students with not only technologies for everyday legal work, but technology skills and knowledge indented to revolutionize the legal world.  Suffolk University Law School offers a Legal Innovation & Technology Certificate. Hofstra students study The Policy and Business of Cryptocurrencies. University of California-Berkeley law students can explore venture capital through Startup@BerkeleyLaw.  These are just a few examples (see more at syllabi commons: https://techforlawstudents.classcaster.net/syllabi-commons/).

In this session, Deborah Ginsberg and Alex Rabanal will:
  • Map an overview of high-tech courses available to law students across the US
  • Describe what these courses have accomplished so far
  • Suggest cutting-edge topics that law schools will need to cover in the future
Attendees will explore possible new course and teaching opportunities for their own organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Ginsberg

Deborah Ginsberg

Educational Technology Librarian, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law Library
Debbie Ginsberg joined Chicago-Kent in 2002 as the Electronic Resources Librarian. She has served as the law school’s Educational Technology Librarian since 2009, assisting faculty students, and staff with using technology for teaching, work, and scholarship. She served as chair... Read More →
avatar for Alexander Rabanal

Alexander Rabanal

Associate Director, The Law Lab, Chicago-Kent College of Law


Thursday June 6, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

3:00pm

From Decoder Rings to Deep Fakes: Translating Complex Technologies for Legal Education
"Technological developments are disrupting the practice of law" is a common refrain, but the last few years has seen some particularly complex pieces of technology become the hot new thing in legal tech. This session will look at blockchain, quantum computing, artificial intelligence, and "Deep Fakes" as examples of how instructors can stay abreast of technological developments and inform themselves about their impacts in the legal profession. Then we will look at how to translate the complexities and jargon of these examples into lessons for for-credit courses, one-off informational sessions, or meetings with stakeholders.


Learning outcomes:


  • Participants will be able to discuss and practice methods for staying up to date and informed about legal technology.
  • Participants will be able to identify the elements to include and the steps to be taken to translate complex technologies into easy to understand lessons. A handout summarizing key takeaways will be provided by the presenters.

Speakers
JT

Jason Tubinis

Law Librarian, UGA Law School Library
avatar for Rachel Evans

Rachel Evans

Metadata Services Librarian, UGA Law Library
Rachel Evans serves as the University of Georgia Alexander Campbell King Law Library's Metadata Services Librarian. Previously she worked as UGA School of Law's web coordinator and has served various roles in three other libraries since 2008. She earned her bachelor's degrees in Art... Read More →


Thursday June 6, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

3:00pm

Puppeteer: Automation of your web scraping and testing using Chrome
This session will provide an introduction to Google's Puppeteer. Puppeteer is an advanced api to control Chrome, including in headless mode, using the open-source, cross-platform Node.js runtime.

This session will show you how to use readily available Chrome extensions to simplify your development of web scraping and testing automation workflows. This session will demonstrate building of a workflow from the beginning as well as discussing and demonstrating multiple use cases as well as covering some limitations in the tools available.

Puppeteer is extremely useful for gathering data where an API or public export is not available. Additionally, it can be used to build out expansive testing workflows including reporting back on performance issues. Puppeteer also provides self healing capabilities as well as the ability to call external programs. This has proven useful to scrape various content sources and then rapidly develop parsing routines in languages more familiar with our staff.

While this session has been marked as an Intermediate audience, please note that we will start with a Beginner overview.

Additional information and examples can be found at Google's website: https://developers.google.com/web/tools/puppeteer 

Speakers
TR

Tom Ryan

Director of Information Technology, Rutgers University


Thursday June 6, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:00pm

Break III
Thursday June 6, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:30pm

Backwards Design: Assessment, Alignment, Quality Matters, and Online Learning Consortium
Administrators, Faculty, and Instructional Designers may find this session valuable as thinking about the end in mind first (Backwards Design) is a beneficial tool when creating courses in any format!  I will walk attendees though online course design specifically, framed by Quality Matters (QM) and Online Learning Consortium (OLC) best practices. Identifying desired results, determining acceptable evidence and then planning learning experiences and instruction (the 3 stages of Backwards Design) is key. Aligning course learning objectives to programmatic outcomes and closing the loop will also be discussed.


Resource: Wiggins, Grant, and McTighe, Jay. (1998). Backward Design. In Understanding by Design (pp. 13-34). ASCD.

Speakers
PB

Patricia Baia

Director of Online Learning and Instructional Technology, Albany Law School
LW

Latia Ward

Research Services Librarian and Diversity Fellow, Cornell University Law Library
MB

Margaret Butler

Associate Director for Public Services, GSU College of Law Library
Meg loves working in the law library where she encourages her colleagues to provide the best service possible to the students who seek assistance. The library provides services including study room reservation, circulation and reference, interlibrary loan, and document delivery.


Thursday June 6, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:30pm

Introducing CALI Author Web!
Now you can create, edit, and publish your own lessons via the web browser.

Speakers
avatar for Sam Goshorn

Sam Goshorn

App Developer, CALI
Sam Goshorn is a web developer at the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (www.cali.org) where he manages the CALI library of lessons and various content authoring tools including CALI Author and QuizWright.
avatar for Elmer Masters

Elmer Masters

Director of Technology, CALI
Elmer R. Masters is the Director of Technology at the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (www.cali.org) where he works on interesting projects involving technology and legal education like eLangdell, Classcaster, Lawbooks, and the CALI website. He has over 20 years experience... Read More →


Thursday June 6, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:30pm

S.C. Legal Services Presentation of LearntheLaw.org Online Classrooms (The Product)
"If you don't have the content, the technology to access it doesn't help." From Opening Remarks of LSC President Jim Sandman at the 2019 Innovations in Technology Conference.

SCLS project attorneys spent 2 years planning, collaborating and learning to create Learn the Law online classrooms with a Technology Innovation Grant from LSC. The presenter will share the evolution of these five classrooms to be officially launched in March 2019. The audience will "Meet Clark" our animated character that introduces each classroom with a 4 minute "How To" video. The classroom subjects are


  • Debt Collection Defense in S.C. Summary Court
  • Getting Your Landlord to Make Repairs in S.C.
  • Unemployment Benefits Appeals in S.C.
  • The ABC's of Guardianship in S.C.
  • Filing for an Order of Protection in S.C.

Technology can be challenging and even overwhelming for some. But if you open your eyes and jump right in, you may surprise yourself. The presentation will demonstrate how the marriage of technology and content makes for great collaboration and eventually a great product. The story of this experience demonstrates how to change the minds of those who say "I'm not really a tech person".

Attendees will walk away with an understanding of 1) how content and collaboration are the key to a great product when it comes to legal tech just as much as the technology itself, and 2) the importance of a diverse group with wide ranging skills and interests when creating a classroom and how to gather such a group.


Speakers
SI

Susie Ingels

Consumer Unit Head, South Carolina Legal Services
Susan Ingles is a Sr. Staff Attorney and Consumer Law Unit Head for S.C. Legal Services (SCLS), a statewide non-profit law firm where her practice is devoted to consumer law and she launched the SCLS Constitution Day Legal Forum in 2012. Before coming to SCLS in September 2004, she... Read More →


Thursday June 6, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
288 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:30pm

The LII: 2020 and beyond
We've been shifting the paradigms of public legal information since 1992, and we're excited to preview some of what we're working on now and have planned for the future.  Will we be creating new collections, or increasing access to free online case law, or improving the way people search for and retrieve legal information, or re-imagining access to the CFR for the visually-impaired, or partnering with other LIIs in far-off places on groundbreaking civic initiatives, or launching an incubator for sparking imagination and creativity in the field of legal informatics?  If you know the LII, you already know the answer is "all of the above."  LII Associate Directors Sara Frug & Craig Newton might talk about some, all, or none of these things. Y'all come down to see us in South Carolina and find out!

Speakers
avatar for Craig Newton

Craig Newton

Legal Information Institute, Associate Director
Ask me about the world's oldest, largest and best repository of free information about American law. :)
avatar for Sara Frug

Sara Frug

Associate Director for Technology, LII - Cornell Law School


Thursday June 6, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

6:00pm

Thursday Night Reception
The Venue on Main - Top Golf Swing Suites
1621 Main Street
Columbia, SC 29201


Top Golf Swing Suite features five state of the art simulator bays including a Champion Suite for the ultimate in luxurious fun. In addition to the bays, there are two well-appointed bars along with a new menu of mouthwatering entrees and appetizers specifically designed for TopGolf Swing Suite by a team of chefs.
Each TopGolf Swing Suite simulator bay accommodates up to eight players and is up-fitted to maximize comfort and fun for our guests. In addition to over 80 meticulously rendered golf courses from around the world, the simulators feature additional games including Baseball, Zombie Dodgeball, Hockey, Football and Classic Carnival games for every skill level.

TOPGOLF GAMES

TOP CONTENDER
Modes: Beginner and Advanced
Ready, aim, and swing toward the colored targets on the field in front of you. Whether it is your first time playing, or you are trying to beat your previous high score, everyone has fun with its classic golf game. Rack up points by hitting the ball harder and further into the targets!

TOP PRESSURE
Modes: Beginner and Advanced
Accumulate points and work your way through the levels of this strategic game. Top Pressure is a round of golf combined with the classic competitive spirit of darts. You don’t need to be a part of the PGA tour to have fun with this game!

TOP CHALLENGE
Modes: Beginner and Advanced
Through this classic golf game, test your skills by hitting the ball as close to the hole as possible! Hit it into the water or the sand trap, and your score won’t hide it! Get ready to tee up against your friends and prove your golf abilities.

BASEBALL PITCHING
Modes: Beginner and Advanced
If golf is not your strong suit, but you’re still looking for a great time, try out our baseball game. Prepare to throw some curveballs in an attempt to strike out the opposing team; don’t let your team down!

CARNIVAL CLASSICS
Modes: Beginner and Advanced
The state fair only comes once a year, but with TopGolf’s Carnival Classic game, you can participate in all of your carnival favorites! Pop balloons and break plates to win. Get enough points, and make it to the bonus round, where you get to dunk a clown!

ZOMBIE DODGEBALL
Modes: Beginner and Advanced
A trio of zombie street dancers is looking to bust a move on your face. Defend yourself by hitting them with dodgeballs until time runs out. If more than one zombie reaches the fence, you’re in big trouble. In advanced mode, fend off a mob of zombie clowns!

HOCKEY SHOTS
Modes: Beginner and Advanced
You won’t need to lace up your skates to hit the ice here. Take aim at various nets and shoot your puck to score! You only have 8 shots, so give it your all. In advanced mode, show off your skills by using your stick to hit the puck into smaller nets.

QUARTERBACK CHALLENGE
Modes: Beginner and Advanced
Down, set, hike! Prove your football abilities by throwing the game-winning touchdown. Your fans are rooting for you, and this is your moment! Don’t let your team down.

Thursday June 6, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm
The Venue on Main Topgolf Swing Suite 1621 Main St, Columbia, SC 29201, USA
 
Friday, June 7
 

8:00am

Breakfast 2
Breakfast 2


Friday June 7, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

9:00am

Enhancing Accessibility for All Law Students
Law schools are legally required to provide accessible content to their students. Complaints against colleges and universities for failing to make their websites and course materials accessible to students with disabilities are on the rise. Accessibility impacts not just websites but also library technologies and materials, course management sites, exam software, and class materials. The task of providing accessible content to law students with disabilities can seem daunting. However, there are easy solutions to common accessibility problems that every law school employee can learn to employ.

This session intends to introduce librarians, faculty and law school technologists to the issues surrounding accessibility. The session will provide easy strategies and techniques to create accessible materials no matter what the delivery mechanism. Attendees will learn how they can proactively ensure equal access to information for all law students.

Learning Objectives:
  • Attendees will learn about legal and moral obligations related to accessibility.
  • Attendees will learn to recognize the common barriers and issues that impact students with disabilities when accessing information in the law school environment.
  • Attendees will discover strategies to employ in their respective departments to ensure the creation of accessible content.
  • Attendees will learn the best practices for creating accessible documents, online course content and materials, videos and web content.
  • Attendees will discover resources and tools to develop accessible online content


Speakers
KC

Karina Condra

FCIL & Emerging Technology Librarian, Westminster Law Library


Friday June 7, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

9:00am

From Concept to Concrete: Teaching Law Students about AI
In 2019, few attorneys practice law without the assistance of some form of artificial intelligence. Indeed, due to the pervasiveness of next-generation legal research platforms, chatbots and expert systems, technology-assisted review in eDiscovery, and document analysis tools used in due diligence, attorneys are utilizing AI-based tools to work more efficiently and accurately.  Despite this synergy, though, and due to a variety of causes, ranging from non-technical backgrounds to repeat viewings of The Terminator, artificial intelligence can seem scary and unapproachable.

During the Spring 2019 semester, the speakers attempted to make AI more concrete and approachable for students enrolled in Northwestern Pritzker School of Law's Legal Technology course. Students were given the opportunity to learn about and test a variety of AI-based tools used in the legal profession. Then, in an effort to demistify concepts such as machine learning, image recognition, and neural networks, students were asked to experiment and interact with several Google AIY Vision Kits.

In this session, the speakers will discuss their experience, including why certain AI-based tools were shown to the students, how the Google AIY Vision Kits were utilized, and the feedback received from students throughout the process. Ultimately, the session will provide attendees with an opportunity to consider how they might incorporate similar tools and concepts into their own instruction and, in the process, make AI a bit more concrete and approachable.


Speakers
avatar for Jesse Bowman

Jesse Bowman

Associate Law Librarian for Technology Initiatives and Instruction, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
Jesse Bowman is the Electronic Research, Technology, and Instructional Services Librarian at the Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. He teaches courses in legal research and legal technology and is always interested in incorporating new tools and technologies into his instructi... Read More →
avatar for Stephan Martone

Stephan Martone

Support and Educational Technologist, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
Stephan has been at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law since 2014. As part of his M.S.Ed. in Learning Design & Technology from Purdue University, he often partners with Jesse Bowman, the Northwestern Pritzker Law Electronic Research, Technology, and Instructional Services Librarian... Read More →


Friday June 7, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

9:00am

If We Had a Redo
As the new University of South Carolina School of Law building was planned and then built, Adam Martin and Gary Moore from the School of Law worked with a third-party integrator and University Classroom Campus Technology over a several year period to design the audio-visual technology in the new University of South Carolina School of law building, as well working with University Technology Services networking group on the networking infrastructure. Along the way, we also were somewhat involved in the planning for furniture and acoustics required in the classrooms and courtrooms as well.

We had two tasks; First, be the client and capture the needs, wants and desires of the law school in regards to the audio-visual technology in classrooms and meeting rooms. Second, ensure adequate infrastructure for information technology in the building for years to come.

Now two years after the opening of the new building, we reflect on things that we got for the most part right and things we would do differently.

Attendees should have a working level knowledge of audio-visual technology. The presentation hopes to give insight to those planning a new building, a major renovation or even the renovation of just a classroom or conference room of what to look for when planning technology, furniture and acoustics.


Speakers
GM

Gary Moore

Assistant Dean for Academic Technology, University of South Carolina School of Law
avatar for Adam Martin

Adam Martin

Audiovisual Instructional Technology Specialist, UofSC School of Law


Friday June 7, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

9:00am

Leveraging e-Resources for Affordable Course Materials
All CALI attendees will understand the session content here. No specialized knowledge is presumed by the presenters. All concepts will be demonstrated or explained in the presentation.

Law students face a heavy economic burden with tuition, textbooks and living expenses during their course of study. We will provide specific recommendations and steps that law school administrators, IT staff, faculty and librarians can undertake to ease this economic burden by facilitating the use of affordable course materials. Attendees will gain practical knowledge of the broad array of affordable and open source course materials, as well as strategies for identifying specific resources and tools to use for connecting students with this content.

Attendees will learn how to implement a more holistic approach when selecting and assigning course materials to leverage the wide array of e-resources collected and managed by law libraries. Additionally, attendees will learn what resources can be suggested as affordable course materials and how to approach law library resources from this perspective. We will explore affordable course materials such as digital repositories of faculty works, licensed content provided via student password access, and combined multidisciplinary article databases licensed university-wide. We will demonstrate practical methods of implementing the existing tools in learning management systems for linking content to facilitate student access to these resources. Best practices and successful outreach methods will be explored, providing attendees with real-world implementation of affordable course materials in legal education. Materials we will demonstrate include open source materials and licensed platforms and tools such as:
  • CALI's eLangdell titles
  • Open source textbook platforms
  • "Study aid" packages from West Academic and LexisNexis
  • Typical academic law library databases
  • Powernotes

Speakers
MA

Mary Ann Neary

Associate Law Librarian for Education & Reference, Lecturer in Law, Boston College Law School
avatar for Lisa Davis

Lisa Davis

Director Law Library, FIU College of Law
Tech teacher, electronic resource tinkerer, librarian.


Friday June 7, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
288 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

10:00am

Break IV
Friday June 7, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

10:30am

Revealed! The new CALI website theme
We're going to launch our new website design during the conference. Join Elmer as he walks you through the new look and talks a bit about the process.

Speakers
avatar for Elmer Masters

Elmer Masters

Director of Technology, CALI
Elmer R. Masters is the Director of Technology at the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (www.cali.org) where he works on interesting projects involving technology and legal education like eLangdell, Classcaster, Lawbooks, and the CALI website. He has over 20 years experience... Read More →


Friday June 7, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

10:30am

"I Thought I Knew What I Was Getting Into" - A Paradigm Shift From Undergrad Online Learning to Online Legal Education
This session will help attendees see how online legal education fits into the context of university-wide online learning efforts, while also highlighting the differing perceptions, regulations, and approaches to online learning between undergrad and law school courses.

Led by David Rose, an instructional designer at American University in Washington, DC, this session will describe his personal experience working in online learning across multiple units at his institution. He will distill these observations into best practices for other institutions looking to increase their online legal offerings.

Over the past two years, there has been a systematic shift in how online education is supported and valued at American University Washington College of Law (AUWCL). Responding to a real need at AUWCL for innovation, centralized policies, and oversight of online offerings, the school created four new positions: an Assistant Dean of Online Learning, a Director of Online Learning, a Coordinator of Online Learning, and an Instructional Designer. David and his colleagues then created processes for new online courses to be developed including mandatory training, best practices, payment structures, and teaching loads. This session will detail the process, challenges, and rethinking about online education that go into the growing of the school's online offerings.

As of Spring 2019, AUWCL has 4 online J.D. courses, 10 online LL.M. courses, 8 online certificate courses, and a new completely online Master of Legal Studies program being developed with a partner vendor. AUWCL is actively expanding their online offerings now that the ABA has increased the number of credits that can be taken online as part of a J.D. to 30. Many schools across the country are doing the same.


The ABA' new allowance has opened a door, but faculty aren't bursting through it. AUWCL's Office of Online Learning was created to help encourage faculty through that door, providing them with detailed course design schedules, aids, best practices, and financial incentives. Participants in this session will hear about AUWCL's process to sustainable online offerings. This session will share what has been learned from dealing with oversight from the ABA, managing course overload schedules, providing proper incentives to online faculty, and simply the relative novelty of online learning at law schools relative to undergraduate education.


Before joining AUWCL, David taught the Online Instructor Training course out of AU's campus-wide Center for Teaching, Research & Learning. This is a 5-week course all instructors were required to take before being allowed to teach online. AUWCL faculty were exempt from this course due to the use of a different LMS. When David transferred to the law school, he assumed he would be able to use the same model and apply it seamlessly to the law school environment. Unfortunately, it did not work, and he had to restructure not only his teaching style, but his course outcomes and goals as well. He experienced a personal paradigm shift in how he thought about online learning -- due to ABA regulations, law faculty perceptions of online education, and incorporating the structure of a new online partner program.


David experienced one form of online education as a student in a completely online, asynchronous master's program in instructional design. His experience and understanding grew as he taught instructors how to create their own online courses for undergraduate students. But the law school environment was a completely different beast.


The session will end with a Q&A for participants to discuss the following questions: How should online legal education be developed? How should it fit into the larger university efforts? What are best practices -- both in terms of academics and policy -- that should be followed? What are models being used at different schools? This session will help anyone associated with online legal education learn from the experience of an instructional designer at American University Washington College of Law.

Speakers
avatar for David Rose

David Rose

Online Learning Trainer & Curriculum Designer, American University
Faculty Innovation Technologist at American University’s Center for Teaching Research & Learning (CTRL), OER Research Fellow for the Open Education Group, student in Purdue University’s online Master of Science in Education in Learning Design & Technology program.Formerly with... Read More →


Friday June 7, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

10:30am

Is There An App for That? Online tools & gamification of legal knowledge
Technology has not only changed how lawyers practice but how law students learn. e-Classroom platforms like Canvas, Blackboard and TWEN have proliferated, electronic casebooks are providing an alternative to heavy, expensive, physical ones and major legal publishers have made significant portions of their content available in ebook format.

Now we see apps like Law School Dojo and Learned Hands, online games focused on legal issue-spotting. CALI has long been an effective online tool for helping law students understand and test their legal knowledge. But as more of legal education goes digital-first, should we assume that all digital resources are the same or as effective as their analog antecedents?

This session is meant to frame a discussion on what the landscape is for digital study (and study aids): what's here, what's missing and most importantly, how do we figure out what works for what types of students. This session would be organized along the following topics, with a goal of getting audience participation:
  • What we know about metacognition (i.e. understanding how one thinks and learns) and law students
  • The range of online study tools for law students
  • Where are there gaps in study tools and how law schools may fill them


Speakers
EE

Eli Edwards

Emerging Tech Research Librarian, Santa Clara University School of Law
Former law firm librarian, first academic library role, teaching legal tech course first time this fall. Do you know where to get good Ethiopian in DC?


Friday June 7, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

10:30am

Using LibGuides and Classmarker for Content Delivery and Online Assessment In and Beyond the Classroom
This presentation will demonstrate the use of online platforms LibGuides and Classmarker as a model for creating virtual textbooks and assessments that support a "flipped" classroom and allow the instructor to focus on student interaction and skills practice during in-class time. The presenter will highlight the strengths and weaknesses of these platforms and offer insights from three years of classroom use, including how to anticipate and resolve potential challenges with moving to an online approach for textbooks and assessment. This includes considering technology policies for one's syllabus, providing ample time for student questions before a deadline, and mitigating the impact of internet service outages. Participants will be introduced to LibGuides and Classmarker and leave with new ideas for using these tools, as well as others, in their own courses.

LibGuides is a content management system that facilitates the creation of online "guides" which can function as stand-alone webpages or as part of a larger website. A "guide" can become a specialized virtual textbook that is tailored to the needs of students while also being responsive to new developments. The LibGuides platform allows the instructor to integrate video and other multimedia content into the text alongside class handouts and other course materials, and students receive the benefit of an efficient, customizable textbook.

Classmarker is an online quiz creation platform that affords instructors the benefit of statistical insight and responds to students' desire for instant feedback. Classmarker supports many question types, from multiple-choice to essay format, and allows students to save a quiz in progress for later completion. Many quizzes can be automatically graded after submission and can include an email confirmation to be sent to the student. Instructors are provided with an overview of student scores in addition to analysis of the results for individual questions. Students receive immediate feedback, and the instructor simultaneously gains a better understanding of which questions the class may be struggling with.

Utilizing tools such as LibGuides and Classmarker has the beneficial impact of supporting a classroom environment where the instructor can focus class time on demonstrations and hands-on practice rather than slideshow lectures and pop quizzes. While each instructor will need to determine the appropriate balance of instruction time within and outside of class time, the use of these tools may greatly expand the horizons of what is possible beyond the classroom.


Speakers
AG

Aaron Glenn

Reference Librarian, University of South Carolina School of Law


Friday June 7, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
288 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

11:30am

Lunch 2
Lunch 2


Friday June 7, 2019 11:30am - 1:00pm
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

12:00pm

Library Tour
Tour the library!

Friday June 7, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Registration

12:00pm

Tech Tour
Hear from Doug Dahlkemper, Principal (SmithGroup), Gary Moore, Assistant Dean for Academic Technology (UofSC Law), and Adam Martin, Audiovisual Instructional Technology Specialist (UofSC Law) as they give a guided tour of the law school explaining all the integral physical nuances, critical thinking decisions behind the technology infrastructure that went into the designing the new University of South Carolina School of Law building.  

Friday June 7, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Registration

1:00pm

Cancelling a Snow Day
Everyone loves a snow day. The joy of an unexpected block of free time. However, the work still must get done - which means suffering through a make-up class and the countless secondary effects a missed day unleashes on a course schedule. Finding a time when everyone can meet, finding a space that is available at that time, and then adjusting due dates for assignments - just to name a few.

This session will discuss how to create content that can be used to host an online makeup class.

A wide range of options will be discussed from posting readings and an audio recording made using a smartphone on a course management site, to hosting a live discussion using conferencing tools such as WebEx.

We see the institutional value of an initiative like this as extending beyond simply facilitating make-up class sessions. As the ABA loosens the restrictions regarding on-line instruction, this is an opportunity for teaching faculty to experiment with instructional technology tools without needing to completely redesign their courses.

Time will be left at the end for participants to share their own experiences working on similar initiatives and to share best practices.

Participants will leave with a toolkit of resources that can be used to create an online make-up class to share with their teaching faculty.


This program was inspired by the Elon University Teaching and Learning Technology Office's campaign to encourage faculty to leverage technology rather than cancel classes.


Speakers
avatar for Charles Perkins

Charles Perkins

Access Services Librarian, Elon
CP

Cassandra Patterson

Reference Librarian, Elon University School of Law


Friday June 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

1:00pm

Gizmos, Gadgets & Grimoires: Enchanting Students by Enhancing Your Online Course World
With the support of professional online instructional designers, the IU McKinney Law faculty has created a virtual cauldron of gizmos and gadgets guaranteed to lure even the most obstinate student into a whole new online world of learning and engagement. Thanks to a grant from the American Bar Association, we've designed a bevy of courses as a "pipeline-to-law school" program for disadvantaged undergraduate students aspiring to a career in the law. Whether your school is contemplating a similar program or you're merely searching for creative approaches to teaching your own courses, we'll turn your musings upside-down as we share our gizmos, gadgets, and grimoires with you:


  • Lightboards (a glass chalkboard full of light) to mimic in-person lectures using diagrams and charts;
  • Scavenger Hunts to encourage learning course policies;
  • Online Tools, such as LucidChart, for diagramming and mind-mapping arguments and judicial opinions;
  • Google Docs and Discussion Forums to create an ongoing collaborative "evolving law" exercise where students collaborate in "courts";
  • Scoreboards and Fantasy Icons for badges and expertise "levels" to encourage mastering the course material;
  • Student-Created Video "reporting on logical fallacies in the media" and "personal introduction" assignments; and
  • Quick Check to assess their critical reading skills (e.g., court opinions).
Novices to experts will come away with their own grimoire of tips, tricks, and conjuring.

Speakers
CA

Cynthia Adams

Clinical Professor of Law, Indiana University M Kinney School of Law
JS

Jennifer Shirk

Online Instructional Designer, Indiana University McKinney School of Law
AM

Allison Martin

Clinical Professor of Law, IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law


Friday June 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

1:00pm

Automating processing and intake in the institutional repository with Python
The Charles B. Sears Law Library at the University at Buffalo School of Law recently completed a seven-month project to load the entire backfile of the schoo's six law journals onto its Digital Commons repository. The vast majority went fairly quickly, but some of the early volumes required a large amount of additional processing.

For its first 22 volumes, the Buffalo Law Review covered current legal developments through case notes, including 14 years of in-depth coverage of the previous year's New York Court of Appeals term. These case notes provide a contemporary review of the development of New York law through the 1950s and 1960s. Unfortunately, these case notes were trapped in large files that contained every case note for a single issue. Additionally, there was no indexing to help users find individual case notes. For the library to make these notes available individually, 100 PDF files would have to be split into almost 1,600 articles, and metadata created for each.

In the past, this processing would have been completed by multiple librarians and student workers. Right now, however, the libraries are facing severe staffing shortages and budget shortfalls. So, instead, through the power of Python, one faculty scholarship librarian was able to split and upload all 1,600 articles within six weeks. Using Python and a few free libraries, the library built a small suite of tools that were used to scan each large file, pull metadata from its embedded text, split the PDFs, and output everything into Digital Commons upload format.

In this session, you will learn about useful Python libraries for this type of project, the workflows used, problems encountered and their solutions, if any. You will also learn about the code structure used and how you can use this in your own repository projects. This session will be useful to any IR manager, whether using Digital Commons or another platform, who has or might have resources needing similar processing. The session does not assume previous Python programming experience, as the presenter had none before starting the project. Some coding knowledge will be helpful to someone embarking on a similar project, but is not necessary.


Speakers
avatar for John Beatty

John Beatty

Faculty Scholarship Outreach Librarian, Charles B. Sears Law Library, University at Buffalo


Friday June 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
288 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

1:00pm

Staying the Course / Staying Relevant
With the downturn in law school applications, funding challenges, staffing changes/reductions and the upswing in ancillary programs to make up for lost revenue, law schools and law school technology departments have new challenges and new goals to address on top of those associated with their well established JD programs.

Whether it's a reduction in staff, reduction in faculty, addition of new programs, new marketing challenges, and more focus on assessment -- we've all seen changes in the past ten years that can test the mettle of those tasked with providing technology support and services to a law school. Professional technology folks, law librarians, and law school administrators must be strategic in allocating resources and setting priorities to best serve the goals of the institution in this time of change.

How does a technology department go from serving one or two programs to a multitude of programs (JD, LLMs, Masters, Certificates, Online) with the same or fewer resources? How does one stay motivated in the midst of these challenges? How do you encourage and motivate your team/yourself to stay innovative, sharp, and relevant to the changing needs of the institution?

Two long-time law school technology managers discuss their personal experiences and how they have stayed in the game and worked to stay relevant in a changing environment in spite of thinning hair and other challenges that come with stress and age.


Speakers
avatar for Phillip Bohl

Phillip Bohl

Assistant Dean, Information Services, Pepperdine School of Law
I grew up on a small family farm in southeast NE. Went to college in OK at ORU, went to law school in CA at Pepperdine, and went to library school in CA at San Jose State. I have enjoyed working in legal education for nearly three decades and absolutely love the people I get to... Read More →
TR

Tom Ryan

Director of Information Technology, Rutgers University



Friday June 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

2:00pm

Break V
Friday June 7, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

2:30pm

A Sense of Belonging: Giving Distance Ed Students the "Law School Experience"
Law schools have an interest in ensuring that remote students feel that they're truly part of the school.  Highly involved students are expected to perform well, identify strongly with the law school experience, and eventually become highly involved alumni.  This session will explore the benefits and challenges of fostering a sense of belonging in distance education students, and discuss the technology and policy efforts that the Syracuse University College of Law is undertaking as it rolls out its JDinteractive hybrid online law program.

This will be a beginner-level discussion of interest to schools who are currently (or who are contemplating) expanding their online programming.


Speakers
JW

Joel Whitney

Computer Consultant, AV Specialist, Syracuse University College of Law


Friday June 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

2:30pm

Creating an Asynchronous Course: A Case Study
One of the presenters had a personal goal: to effectively use all of CALI's tools in her asynchronous online class, with an emphasis on their use for formative assessment.

This session will summarize her experience, as she explored CALI's tools on her own and with CALI staff help. Additionally, faculty will learn how to identify and use the most appropriate CALI tools for their courses whether online or face-to-face. We will also cover some of the more interesting features of each tool.

For example, have you ever wondered how to easily add a question or change a response in a CALI lesson? Or, edit a chapter of an eLangdell book? Or, produce a podcast or a blog using Classcaster? Or, use LessonLinks? And, much more.

CALI TOOLS: QuizWright, Instapoll, eLangdell, Classclaster, CALI Author, and CALI Lessons.

This session will have tips for beginners and experts.

Speakers
avatar for Deb Quentel

Deb Quentel

Director of Curriculum Development & Associate Counsel, The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction
Distance education CALI content including lessons and elangdell casebooks online learning making content
SW

Sally Wise

Professor of Law Emerita, University of Miami


Friday June 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

2:30pm

A Timelord, a Timeline and Legal Instruction
From online embeds to interactive displays, timelines can serve many purposes and tell powerful stories. In this session librarians team up with an archivist and a clinician to bring history to life, engage students, and preserve the scholarly and institutional milestones. A variety of tools for creating digital timelines and gathering content will be shared including TikiToki, TimeToast, and Piktochart. Comparisons will be given based on cost, technical limitations, collaborative potential, and general ease of use. Potential applications for timelines will also be shared in the form of examples including:
  • a TimeToast embedded timeline tribute for individual faculty scholarship as a part of research guides 
  • a TikiToki multi-media timeline celebrating the growth of clinical and experiential learning programs over the course of 50 years
  • a Piktochart timeline for classroom slides or printed display illustrating a series of significant trials
Time permitting, a live demo will guide attendees through the creation of a timeline with one of the tools. This session will be of interest to technologists, librarians and faculty alike. Attendees will walk away with an overview of the tools available for making timelines, ideas for how they could be used for instructional purposes, and a guide including examples and resources. 

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Evans

Rachel Evans

Metadata Services Librarian, UGA Law Library
Rachel Evans serves as the University of Georgia Alexander Campbell King Law Library's Metadata Services Librarian. Previously she worked as UGA School of Law's web coordinator and has served various roles in three other libraries since 2008. She earned her bachelor's degrees in Art... Read More →
avatar for Sharon Bradley

Sharon Bradley

Special Collections Librarian, University of Georgia School of Law
Sharon Bradley is the Special Collections Librarian at the University of Georgia School of Law. She is responsible for the school’s archives, portrait collection, and rare book room. She also leads the school’s emergency preparedness and disaster planning efforts. In quiet moments... Read More →
EL

Eleanor Lanier

Associate Dean for Clinical Programs and Experiential Learning, University of Georgia School of Law


Friday June 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

3:30pm

Break VI
Friday June 7, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
101 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:00pm

CALI in 2025 - Jetsons, Dystopias, Zombies? Choosing Our Own Adventure
Every year, I do a session talking about the current and near future of CALI.  This session is not that.  I am 57 years old and by 2025, I will be 65 and possibly retiring. CALI could be doing more and doing it better and moving the needle in legal education and access to justice and I will talk about those ideas and how we might find a path there.

Speakers
avatar for John Mayer

John Mayer

Executive Director, The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction
Executive Director of CALI - law school consortium. Developers of A2J Author and hosts of A2J.org. Not a lawyer, 30 years working in tech, legal education and access to justice.


Friday June 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm
289 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:00pm

THE MEAT SHOWER MYSTERY! - Teaching Soft Skills and Information Literacy Through Immersive Experiences
You are stuck in an office with only 45 minutes to look into the disappearance of Dr. Celeste Viande, a scientist on the brink of solving the mystery behind the infamous Kentucky Meat Shower of 1876!* Using only your investigative skills and clues that Dr. Viande left behind, it is up to you and your team to find Dr. Viande's research before it self-destructs!
That is the prompt given to our students who sign up for our immersive learning experience (similar to an escape room). By using an immersive experience, we teach our students soft skills (such as teamwork, communication, and attention to details) and information literacy in a fun and interactive environment. Students can be resistant to learning new skills, especially if they think they have already mastered the skill being taught. Shifting the paradigm by changing the format of how skills are taught can have a big impact on student reception.
This session will explain how to create an immersive experience tailored to your patrons and budget that teaches soft skills and information literacy (both which will be further defined), and how you can adapt the experience to teach other skills. Whether you're interested in starting your own immersive experience, have questions about one you are already running, or just want to know more about the idea in general, this is the session for you!
*Based on contemporary reports, on March 3, 1876, in Bath County, KY, shortly before noon, a substance that appeared to be flakes of meat rained out of a sunny sky for approximately a minute and a half. Some samples were “preserved” and sent to various individuals, including scientists, for analysis; while no definitive answer was ever reached, the substance was most likely mutton. As for how it happened that meat rained out of the sky, again no answer was ever reached, though the predominant and most probable theory is that one or more vultures disgorged themselves while in flight, despite witnesses reporting perfectly clear skies.
**Vegetarians and vegans welcome! Eating during the session is discouraged.


Speakers
avatar for Charlie Amiot

Charlie Amiot

Student Services and Outreach Librarian, University of Kentucky College of Law


Friday June 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm
288 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:00pm

Aligning Video Elements within a Community of Inquiry
Incorporating asynchronous video in your online, hybrid, and face-to-face courses can enhance the student experience  when used with careful consideration. In this session, the Community of Inquiry model will be presented as a basis for the incorporation of media elements.

From the tri-partite foundation of cognitive presence, teaching presence, and social presence, we will identify targeted, high-impact opportunities for integrating video in your courses. We will explore case examples from the James E. Rogers College of Law and discuss the importance of a pedagogically sound strategy for the incorporation of video elements. We will investigate and analyze vignettes ranging from DIY screen capture to high-production studio video. Finally, through a collaborative participant activity, you will consider your own courses and programs to determine the most appropriate ways video might be of value to you.

Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to mix-and-match video solutions to meet student, instructor, and institution needs.


Speakers
AO

Amber Owens

Associate Director of Instructional Design, James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona


Friday June 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm
397 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

4:00pm

Open-Source Alternatives to Digital Commons
A significant number of law schools have adopted BePress' Digital Commons as their hosting platform, and institutional repository, for student journals, faculty scholarship, and journal symposia.  With the acquisition of BePress by Elsevier, some in our community are concerned that a single vendor owns the entire "life-cycle" of legal scholarship as one company owns SSRN, Expresso, and Digital Commons.  In response, some law schools are considering open-source alternatives to Digital Commons both due to budgetary constraints and concerns about a vendor having too much control over how a law school manages its own intellectual output.

This session will discuss alternatives to Digital Commons, including:
  • The Hyku and Hyrax project from Duraspace based on Fedora.
  • The upcoming release of Dspace 7
  • The Python-based Tind platform based on Invenio
  • The Islandora project based on Drupal and Fedora
  • The Open Journal System project from the Public Knowledge Project


Speakers
avatar for David Holt

David Holt

Reference Librarian, UC Davis - School of Law


Friday June 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm
395 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC

5:00pm

Closing Plenary
Lots of awesome giveaways!


Speakers
avatar for John Mayer

John Mayer

Executive Director, The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction
Executive Director of CALI - law school consortium. Developers of A2J Author and hosts of A2J.org. Not a lawyer, 30 years working in tech, legal education and access to justice.


Friday June 7, 2019 5:00pm - 5:30pm
103 University of South Carolina School of Law, Columbia SC
 


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